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opportunities that, you hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. studies have shown that throughout the united iowa, that also in all growth in workforce in the 30 years will be attributable to immigrants. because of this demographic of retiring baby-boomers and the after them.oming and, of course, also, i think, alluded to, we also need to fill jobs that are currently here. need to create jobs, we need innovation. this is where immigrants have contributed to america as well. immigrants are more likely as a roup to start businesses, immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they're high-tech the industries and that than native foreign counterparts. and then finally, we have to we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from rest of the world. economy.'s true for our and so therefore our economy is sum game. our workforce is not a zero sum game. usinesses and workers adapt to changing policies and circumstances. so we work with the rest of the a sense we're in competition for the rest of the world. or exports, imports, and workforce. so immigration from the business sh
, ladies and >> that is some big shoes to follow. party respects women across america. me greathy it gives pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. an awardeated to give to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. to tomar's award went harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] stage some me on women withdemocratic onhereto except the award senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary asham clinton was sworn in secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public fromls before graduating wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by jimmy carter to serve on the board of the legal
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
praised essential new book "collision 2012", obama versus romney and the future of elections in america. he joins us now from washington, d.c. dan, what a pleasure. thank you so much for being here on "viewpoint." >> john, thank you. >> john: congratulations to all of the acclaim your book has received. as you know, this weekend in iowa, both santorum and cruz criticized the romney campaign for its use of the catchphrase "you did build that." their argument it was another instance of him cozying up to the rich republicans. was that mitt romney's core problem as you see it? >> well, it was certainly a problem, john, in this respect. governor romney and president obama look at the economy from two totally different perspectives. their life experiences push them in different directions. when governor romney talked about the economy, he often talked about it from the perspective of job creators, whether small business people or larger business owners. he did not talk about the economy in terms of the working people. the people who were working in those factories or in the small businesses.
taxes. democrats want to give them more power? they want this agency involved in america's healthcare? no way. watchdogagency's own says the irs can't handle the job. , the inspector general stated they are not 'snfident about the irs ability to protect confidential information or protect fraud. neither am i. by any indication, neither are the american people. it has been three years since the healthcare law was passed. in less than two months, the administration claims it will be ready to implement the law. in the face of all these , more americans than ever want this law to be repealed. it is simple. increased healthcare costs to families and individuals. it has stifled individuals from expanding. it has forced job creators to cut hours. just yesterday, a key official could not confirm that the healthcare law was lowered in my home state of michigan. wasn't this the signature propolis -- promise of this administration? premiums would be lower. the administration cannot make good on that promise. with so little time before , it ises are set to open extremely concerning that the admin
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to remember and recall the life of carla anderson. carla passed away on july 23, after a month-long fight against an infection. she was 52, a loving mother, devoted wife and deputy executive director of the next generation 911 institute. it was in this capacity that i had the privilege of working with her. technology continued to move forward, congresswoman anna eshoo and i worked closely as part of the congressional e-911 congress. she was part of legislation passed by congress to advance 911 services. in so doing, many lives have been saved. as first responders throughout the country could not on
. [booing] over the next 15 months, we are going to decide what kind of america we want to have. what kind of kentucky want to have. there are only two answers to this question. barack obama's vision for america. or kentucky's. ground -- crowd does not like it. kentucky's voice is often the voice of opposition. to the obama agenda. i am proud of that. that is why every liberal in america, every liberal in america have announced they will beat us next year. know, the liberals are worried because it just as i predicted obama care is a disaster for america. [applause] i fought them every step of the way, every step of the government takeover. up to their war on coal. look, as long as i am in the senate, kentucky will have a voice. [applause] all of these liberals to come down here to push me around, they are not going to get away with it, are they? ind paul, it would fill, and -- ed whitfield, and i take the fight every single day. let me give you an example. a few months ago thomas the cannots decided that you fish below the dams below the river anymore. up the group and we got together with
this was going to be not just a political demonstration. this was going to be a monumental for wlak america. >> you mention the dixiecrats, white southern democrats, but we have a clip -- this was from governor, not a senator, george wallace, one of the preeminent dixie crats of '60s, responding to john f. kennedy, saying positive things about the march. >> the president has said this is in the great tradition. i shall look forward to being there, but at the same time, the great tradition, they have already alerted thousands upon thousands of troops in the area of washington for preparation for this matter and so this great tradition of marching in washington, on the one hand being invited, on the other hand, they're preparing for -- as if we were going to have a civil war in washington. >> i mean, bob, there was -- in 1963 everybody knows everybody thinks john f. kennedy is running for reelection. the question is george wallace going to run against him. for people that did not read through the era, hearing about george wallace, and reading about him now, it might be tempting to underestima
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
states of america and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from maryland reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. issa: at this time i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from north carolina. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to address the individual from maryland, the gentleman from maryland as he lks about it's all about all employees and indeed it is because if we allow this continued behavior to go on, it tarnishes the good reputation workers that day in, day out serve this country and the citizens so well. mr. meadows: and what we're talking about is giving a tool, a management tool to let managers manage. we're talking about not giving bonuses, mr. speaker. we're talking about not giving bonuses to those that are at the very highest, the 1%, while the rank and file goes so many times without being recognized or compensated for what they deserve. you know, we're talking about employees that make
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no business giving them our money. i thank you very much. hubie: thank you, shane. from maryland. our next caller from ports myth, howe. good morning. caller: good morning. i enjoy your program here. just a quick comment about what's going on in egypt. people don't realize that they it -- america a pretty much put the president there before, and they lived under, generally, what america -- with freedom. now they have this muslim brotherhood guy who came in here and tried to slowly bring back shari'a law to this country. they'll people are
to corporate america about that one. maybe 75 days, two or three quarters max. but we make the long-term projections and in this the short term projection. one huge question i have that a lot of us had is the uncertainty just in the out years? we all know there's a huge amount of uncertainty about tomorrow. we're willing to go tomorrow? where will interest rates go tomorrow? based on what ben bernanke says or any other number of people. there could be an awful lot of fluctuation that can happen in the very near term. we saw earlier today would have been in the stock market over a brief period of time i think on jim's slide hitting it so we do not in our models in the deterministic models have that much enormous deflection in the near term. we have more deflection in the long term. but there's one other aspect of it. our stochastic model evin is based on having the individual parameters flecha bate around the extent to which the year to year fluctuations are in the past. we don't have built in either perimeter of certainty or what we sort of think of as the sort of central tendency v
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
be the face of leadership for the united states of america now. to think now we've got back and forth going between our president and vladimir putin because he called them the kid that's slouching in the back of the roochl room, yet that's the the picture that now will be shown all over the world of our president. >> can you blame his staff? i'm thinking to myself if i got caught on camera doing that, i would want to blame someone other than myself. do you think his staff should have run interference on that one. >> one of the things, you're always supposed to set your boss up for success. i think this was failing in them doing that. so again, if you're going have the press corps out there on the links while you're playing golf, you should be a little more circumspect and retrospective about what the second and third order effect of a picture like that could be. >> they did release one where it's me -- the national security adviser susan rice, they did release that one to the media, which was, you know - >> which one is going to get the most air play. >> yes, look. when the american people
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
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creating competitive industry. >> but since 2000 there's only new carrier in our country virgin america. we have on the others one in minnesota but there new carrier viable since 2000. and don't you think there are to entry that make it hard for new airlines to competitive? over thenk if you look last many years there have been industry.ts into the jetblue is a great example of a -- that sprang grown last decade and has nationwide. so, i think there are ample opportunities and capital vailable for new airlines to enter the market. >> i note that jetblue is only we have nowrket and these three major carriers. do you want to respond? first off, again noting how complementary our two networks by putting them together we create a third competitor -- fourth competitor to what are three airlines larger ta and s, united, dell southwest and allows more competition, not less. 12 laps overlatch being out put00 -- overlapping we can more efficient service to consumers. also note that in the $1 billion synergies that i noted there s not one assumed fare increase. he synergies are not built on assum
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
the case for putting america's house in order" and in washington columnist for bloomberg view al hunt. start off talking about a-rod, look tat the front page of "the new york post," a-roid rage has the last laugh in the sixth inning. >> i will say i'm a red sox fan, interest of full disclosure. these are the things that can turn a season around. when the red sox won the series in '04 that spat with jason vary tech and a-rod where vary tech took it to a-rod when he seemed bigger than the game turned his season around. if he gets to play out the rest of the year it's big for the yankees. >> also something wrong with the rules of baseball. after the pitcher goes after a-rod, the idea he's not tossed out of the game, both teams equally warned, that's outrageous. girardi was right, should not have been thrown out of the game. the pitcher should have been thrown out of the game. >> i thought it was just pitching him inside. >> don't you love that? >> what are you talking about? >> crowding the plate and he clearly threw a few balls and a-rod stepped into one. >> no funny business there. >>
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
: for "good morning america," aditi roy, abc news, new york. >> thank you, aditi. >>> now, to an abc news exclusive. a truly remarkable story. the fbi is, in fact, looking for your help this morning. reopening an almost half-century-old mystery. kidnapping and mistaken identity. a remarkable story coming to light thanks to months of work by our barbara walters. barbara here with us this morning. and this all started when a newborn was stolen from a hospital in chicago. >> that's right. and by the way, you mentioned my colleagues. this is the abc investigative unit. and we're very big. imagine a mother whose baby is stolen out of her arms. she gets the baby back. or so she thinks. and now, almost 50 years later, that son she raised has come forward to speak exclusively to us. looking at old family photographs of paul fronczak is a strange experience. because the baby in his baby pictures is not him. how do you feel when you see this picture? >> i feel like i want to find him and hug him and make sure he's okay. >> reporter: paul fronczak recently discovered his entire life, his name, his p
forcing -- there is an organizing i'm advising calling the compact for america trying to get a balanced budget amendment and get a convention call a nifty idea to control a run away convention. there are policy innovations that states are trying to put together, again, across a host of areas left, right, which is trying to reassert the original dynamic. not nullify. states cannot say federal law is no good. just to rebalance the power in the country. host: ian, can you speak to federal effort pushing back? if that's the way right to look at this. what is or what can the federal government do once states put these efforts into place? guest: if we are talking about an actual nullification law, that's when the state tries to forbid the federal government from forcing its own law, those laws are void almost automatically. guest: john c. calhoun is probably roaming the studios right now. guest: the federal official would try to enforce the law, presumably the state would try to stop them. and then it would be very easy for the federal government to get a court order to say that the state can
the corporations in america are behaving exactly as most selenium would have liked in .taly fascism is at merger of the state and the corporations. that is the direction in which we are heading. marie tweets us this morning -- next up is gregory from north carolina, independent line. perot, i was a ross ralph nader, our current president, and hillary clinton. what about those four, in summary, do you support? caller: i am concerned about the -- the prior caller hit it on the head. not curve lineup is raining in the sequester -- north carolina is raining in the sequester. they try to cut back on schools, hospitals, you name it. i had to do a paradigm shift and go for independent money. how are you going to sell computer equipment to a family easier when it would be to sell the schools that can buy thousands. reynard from virginia, republican line, good morning. the person who i think best present my political party is none. did elected they start representing the national party. what makes you come to that decision? -- oncespecifically they get elected, even though locally we put them in for a sp
these petitions. what you get is women actively participating in politics to change america for the better. the other great women's movement is the temperance movement. they are active in movements to prevent prostitution. these are things that are close to what would be considered domesticity for women, but is outside the house. it is in the public space. someone like sarah polk, with the exception of temperance, would have been appalled at what these women were asking for. eventually, by 1848, someone in and a few men, such as frederick douglass, are asking for the right to vote for women. that is a long time in coming. it is beginning at this time. >> headers on the phone from jackson,, mississippi. what is your question? >> i would like to know who ran against james k. polk when he was running for president and did sarah polk play the part? >> polk runs against henry clay from kentucky. clay had run twice again before this. he thinks it is his turn. he expects it will be a cake walk, because nobody has heard of jim spoke. he makes a number of mistakes during the campaign, and in the en
disagree with his lifestyle choices, he's out there protecting the united states of america, he deserves your respect. >> and you know what, guts. that's what this all boils down to. what we're all talking about. it's just speaking out. mike allen, mike, we started with you. i was just talking about since 2006, republicans have grimaced and hidden in the corners and they've -- oh, what are we going to do about -- these people on talk radio, these people on cable news that are saying these things that are driving off the very swing voters we need to get elected to the white house again. >> yeah. >> guts. they don't have guts to speak out against the treex emmists. mitt romney never had the guts to speak out against the most extreme elements in his party. and he lost in part because he followed extremists down a rabbit hole in iowa, in a caucus process, on immigration, and he got slaughtered among hispanic-americans because of it and he got beaten in other areas too because he never spoke out and had that famous bill clinton sister soldier moment that by the way conservatives cheered when
, there is one category where the u.s. has clearly led, foreclosure rates. only in america, can you find a government that subsidizes housing more so that we the people can get less. not have to look overseas to see a well functioning housing market. without government-sponsored enterprises. we don't have to look any further than our own jumbo market that has successfully operated without them. the housing bust, the jumbo market was 20% of our total housing market. there was capital, liquidity, competition, eight 30-year fixed mortgage choice and innovation all right here in america. all of that was delivered for from 7-20 basis points what the gse's offered. modest amount to avoid taxpayer bailouts, government control and economic catastrophe. i think it is important that whatever modest interest rate benefit the gse's delivered to , to some extent, it was clearly offset by the inflation of housing principles for the very same home buyers. in other words, it is not self- evident that the homebuyer was any better off. at, to some extent, it was clearly the end of the day,t argument i hav
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
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to the white house later today and beginning a two-day focus on the situation of education in america, a two-day bus trip through new york and eastern pennsylvania and getting daily briefings on the situation in egypt. in that country the streets remain relatively quiet following another day of demonstrations yesterday. the story in "the new york times" explaining how the u.s. and european diplomats were undercut by egypt's military, the death toll this weekend exceeding 800. later we're going to focus on what's next for egypt but we want to begin with a peace piece this morning in the baltimore sun. focused why are americans so angry and divided? you can join in on the through our republican, democratic and independent lines. you can send us a tweet at or join us facebook at >> the question why are americans so angry and divided? one says -- >> one of the reasons for that polarization of course is the implementation of the president's health-care law. the president has been on vacation but in his weekly address he did talk about the upcoming deadline as the affordable he
respects and admires women throughout america. that is why it gives me great pleasure tonight to honor one of the greatest american female politicians with the beacon award. the beacon award was begun in 2008 and it was created to give an award to an outstanding nationallyatewide or who exemplifies the best of the democratic party ideals and values. 2008, it was awarded to senator edward kennedy. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy and berkeley. to u.s. senator john culver. to senatet went majority leader mike. last year's award went to tom harkin. i am pleased to announce that this year's beacon award has been awarded to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage, before i give a little about senator and secretary of state hillary clinton's bio, i have some women with me who are here to accept the award on secretary clinton's the half. with that, a little bit of bio information about secretary clinton and then we will have joy who will represent our group of north iowa democratic women to accept the award. on january 21, 2009, hillary clinton was sworn in as the 67th secre
on our phone calls. >> obama: america is not interested on spying ordinary people. we're focused on finding the information necessary to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> bill: but it still remains to be said and shown how collecting information on every single phone call made in the united states by every single american who places the call, how long the call is and who they're calling, hard to see how that helps us find a terrorist in the middle east. remember last week this whole new terror scare that we found out about, took action, closed those embassies, nothing to do with this domestic spying program. that domestic spying program did not help one damn bit. i join republicans and democrats in congress. you've got people in congress like john conyers on the left, and james sensenbrenner on the right. you have dick durbin on the left and rand paul on the right all saying there have to be limits to this data collection, and there should be probable cause or some sufficient reason for going after those phone data on a particular person before you rando
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
industry is in shammens, and, in fact, mexico, one of the great parts of the north america with all the oil reserves could be a net oil importer without this help so they need it desperately praying that it will. lori: what's the impact on world oil prices? >> i think in the short term, not a lot. if you look at oil prices there, excited about this? no. the big picture is the big oil majors getting in there, start projects, and they turn around decline of mexican production. it's going to make north america a power house with energy production, and it's good for the entire region. lori: that's the goal. thank you. >> thank you. lori: breaking news, hearing first word now from u.s. airways and american airlines in a joint press release. they will fight the effort by the department of justice working to ham their merger saying they'll have a strong defense against the government's lawsuit and basically denouncing the government's claim this is anticompetitive and cuts jobs, and, in fact, it benefits flying consumers. adam: people question the timing of the announcement from the doj. more to c
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